whale sleep

About   

I mean, so like yeah and stuff I guess
"We live in an age of labels and categories, and this is reflected in our fiction — just look at our obsession with the Sorting Hat in Harry Potter, the Factions in Divergent, and all the associated personality quizzes and “which-blank-are-you” tests online. … Personally, I am growing more and more uncomfortable with any kind of us-versus-them duality, especially when it comes to something like mental illness – because our society as a whole is deeply disturbed, and to single out some people as “mentally ill” implies that the problem is contained in a small population, when in fact it’s embedded in our way of life."
— 1 week ago with 130 notes

digg:

Sony dropped 8 million flower petals on a Costa Rican village to promote their new TV line.

(via npr)

— 1 week ago with 2747 notes

crookedindifference:

Read the Apollo 11 Flight Plan in Its 353-Page Entirety

Exactly 45 years ago today, after months of preparation, Apollo 11 embarked on its now-legendary mission to the moon. But what exactly does it take to send three men into the great, vacuous unknown? See for yourself.

This 353-page document is the entire Apollo 11 flight plan in all its scientific glory. And if it gets a little confusing it’s because this is one of those rare cases where, yes, it actually is rocket science.

Thankfully, the National Archives does provide a small amount of decoding of the highly technical literature. This acronym key should be of some help:

  • CSM = Command Service Module
  • CMP = Command Module Pilot (Mike Collins)
  • LM = Lunar Module
  • CDR = Commander of the Mission (Neil Armstrong)
  • LMP = Lunar Module Pilot (Buzz Aldrin)
  • MCC-H = Mission Control Center-Houston.
  • LLM = Lunar Landing Mision
  • S/C = Spacecraft

And as an added bonus, NASA has also kindly made available the entire Apollo 11 onboard voice transcription. Yep—you get to be privy to every last word uttered between our three space heroes as they were making history happen.

(via itsfullofstars)

— 1 week ago with 735 notes
#moon  #space  #nasa 
mapsontheweb:

The size of North America compared to the Great Red Spot on Jupiter.
Great Red Spot, an enormous, long-lived storm system on the planet Jupiter and the most conspicuous feature of its visible cloud surface. It is generally reddish in colour and oval in shape, approximately 20,000 km long and 12,000 km wide (12,400 by 7,500 miles)—large enough to engulf Earth and Mars side by side.

mapsontheweb:

The size of North America compared to the Great Red Spot on Jupiter.

Great Red Spot, an enormous, long-lived storm system on the planet Jupiter and the most conspicuous feature of its visible cloud surface. It is generally reddish in colour and oval in shape, approximately 20,000 km long and 12,000 km wide (12,400 by 7,500 miles)—large enough to engulf Earth and Mars side by side.

(Source: astronomycentral.co.uk, via spaceexp)

— 1 week ago with 1205 notes
ecowatchorg:

Detroit Water Brigade Fights for Basic Human Right of Clean Drinking Water
Since May, the Detroit Water Authority has sought to stop service to 3,000 households per week, for being $150 or more delinquent on their bills. In a city where 40 percent of residents are living at or below the poverty level, this translates to the most vulnerable segment of the population being denied a basic necessity.
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/14/detroit-water-brigade-clean-drinking-water/

ecowatchorg:

Detroit Water Brigade Fights for Basic Human Right of Clean Drinking Water

Since May, the Detroit Water Authority has sought to stop service to 3,000 households per week, for being $150 or more delinquent on their bills. In a city where 40 percent of residents are living at or below the poverty level, this translates to the most vulnerable segment of the population being denied a basic necessity.

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/07/14/detroit-water-brigade-clean-drinking-water/

— 1 week ago with 34 notes

skunkbear:

The Eighth International Conference on Mars kicks off today - a perfect opportunity to share the USGS’s beautiful geologic map of Mars. The last map like this was made in 1986, and we’ve learned a whole lot since then. 

The different colors represent different types of rock. Viewed through a geological lens the red planet looks more like a rainbow planet.

The Mapmakers: Kenneth L. Tanaka, James A. Skinner, Jr., James M. Dohm, Rossman P. Irwin, III, Eric J. Kolb, Corey M. Fortezzo, Thomas Platz, Gregory G. Michael, and Trent M. Hare

(via npr)

— 1 week ago with 390 notes
#mars  #geology 
borninflames:

Saul Williams, from the zine “Excuse Me, Can You Please Pass the Privilege?" — click the link to download, the whole thing is a fucking great read. And thanks to garconniere's reblog which pointed me thataway!

borninflames:

Saul Williams, from the zine “Excuse Me, Can You Please Pass the Privilege?" — click the link to download, the whole thing is a fucking great read. And thanks to garconniere's reblog which pointed me thataway!

(via jonahthebrave)

— 1 week ago with 6607 notes